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How Much Should You Pay Your Sitter or Nanny?

Are you trying to figure out how much to pay your babysitter or nanny? It’s important to set a competitive rate to attract the most qualified applicants, but you also don’t want to overpay – a night out is already expensive enough! Use the table to compare rates nearby, then check out more tips below to set a rate for your sitter or nanny.

Top Cities

Sitter Age:
Rates based on 2 children Under 21 Over 21
Atlanta, GA $12.25/hr $12.67/hr
Austin, TX $12.08/hr $12.17/hr
Baltimore, MD $11.92/hr $12.08/hr
Boston, MA $14.42/hr $14.92/hr
Charlotte, NC $11.42/hr $11.58/hr
Chicago, IL $12.67/hr $12.92/hr
Cleveland, OH $10.67/hr $10.83/hr
Columbus, OH $10.25/hr $10.33/hr
Dallas, TX $12.00/hr $12.17/hr
Denver, CO $11.75/hr $11.92/hr
Detroit, MI $10.42/hr $10.67/hr
Hartford, CT $12.17/hr $12.42/hr
Houston, TX $11.75/hr $12.00/hr
Los Angeles, CA $13.83/hr $14.25/hr
Miami, FL $12.17/hr $12.42/hr
Minneapolis, MN $11.25/hr $11.50/hr
New York City, NY $14.42/hr $14.92/hr
Philadelphia, PA $12.17/hr $12.50/hr
Phoenix, AZ $10.92/hr $11.08/hr
Portland, OR $11.58/hr $11.83/hr
San Diego, CA $11.67/hr $12.00/hr
San Fransisco, CA $15.75/hr $16.00/hr
Seattle, WA $13.17/hr $13.67/hr
Tampa, FL $10.92/hr $11.25/hr
Washington, D.C. $13.25/hr $13.58/hr

7 More Factors to Consider in How Much to Pay

1. Nannies and babysitters are not the same, and neither are their rates

On paper, the hourly rate of a nanny may seem lower than a sitter. But employers also often provide their nannies additional benefits like paid time off, health insurance, gas money, and cell phones.

Considerations for babysitters:

  • Work part-time and as-needed for several families
  • Paid hourly, usually at the end of a shift

Considerations for nannies:

  • Work full-time and the same hours each week for one family
  • Paid weekly or monthly salaries
  • A portion of living expenses can be subtracted for live-in nannies

2. Pay more for more kids

As any parent knows, more kids means more work, especially when the children’s ages are varied. So for each additional child, pay your sitter or nanny an extra $1 or $2.

3. Pay older and more experienced sitters and nannies higher wages

There’s a difference in experience – both in life experience and child caring experience – between your neighbor’s 11-year-old daughter and a nanny of 10 years who is CPR and first aid certified. Take their education level and foreign language skills into consideration, too.

4. Additional responsibilities require higher pay

If you need your sitter or nanny to pick up the kids from school, help with homework, or perform household tasks like cooking dinner or cleaning, plan to pay more for the additional services.

5. Cost of living isn’t the only location-based factor to consider

It’s a given that caregivers in more expensive cities like Manhattan or San Francisco are more expensive than those in smaller Midwestern cities. But you’ll also need to think about how long it takes for the sitter or nanny to travel to work. If you live in a rural area where she has to drive 45 minutes each way, you might have to pay more to make it worth her time for a 2-hour babysitting job.

6. Once you find someone who’s great with your kids, consider giving them a raise

Once you find a sitter or nanny who both you and your kids love, you might consider adding $1 to their hourly rate. This is a great way to both show appreciation for their work and keep them around.

7. Be prepared to pay extra for special occasions

If you plan to hire a sitter for New Year’s Eve or Valentine’s Day, you’ll need to pay more than your usual rate. Sitters are in high demand at these times.

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